Today in South Asian history: the Siege of Delhi ends (1857)

The 1857 Siege of Delhi is interesting in that it serves as both a pivotal battle and a pivotal marker in world history. Or at least it seems that way to me. As a phase of the 1857-1859 Indian Rebellion, it was a decisive British victory that did much to stifle the rebellion’s national ambitions,… Continue reading Today in South Asian history: the Siege of Delhi ends (1857)

Today in South Asian history: a monumental passing (1631)

I don’t usually worry about historical births and deaths around here–for one thing, most of the people I would cover reckoned time according to the Islamic calendar, so noting when they were born and/or died according to our calendar would be somewhat ahistorical. But today I feel like making an exception. The Mughal Emperor Shah… Continue reading Today in South Asian history: a monumental passing (1631)

Today in South Asian history: Nader Shah sacks Delhi (1739)

The Mughal Empire was easily the richest of the three so-called “Gunpowder Empires”–the Ottomans and the Safavids were the other two–that dominated the Islamic world from the 15th century (for the Ottomans; 16th century for the other two) into the 18th century (and, at least in the Ottoman case, well beyond that). In the patterns… Continue reading Today in South Asian history: Nader Shah sacks Delhi (1739)

Today in South Asian history: the Battle of Karnal (1739)

Nader Shah (d. 1747) is often considered the last of the great (in the sense of “impressive,” not “good”) Central Asian conquerors, after Genghis Khan and Timur (Tamerlane), and (depending on who’s making the list) assorted other figures like the first Mughal Emperor Babur. He also the man who kept Iran more or less intact… Continue reading Today in South Asian history: the Battle of Karnal (1739)