Today (or a few days) in North African history: the Battle of Kasserine Pass (1943)

The Battle of Kasserine Pass, which took place from February 19-25, 1943, was the follow up to the Battle of Sidi Bouzid earlier that month and and engagement at nearby Faïd Pass in late January. In the first two clashes, Axis forces under the command of General Hans-Jürgen von Arnim and Field Marshal Erwin Rommel … Continue reading Today (or a few days) in North African history: the Battle of Kasserine Pass (1943)

Today in American history: the burning of the USS Philadelphia (1804)

It seems pretty odd to imagine a modern-day aircraft carrier or guided missile cruiser falling into the hands of an enemy during wartime, but that’s pretty much what happened in the case of the Philadelphia. She was one of the biggest ships in the (admittedly still small) American navy, but more importantly she was more … Continue reading Today in American history: the burning of the USS Philadelphia (1804)

Today in North African history: the Battle of Sidi Bouzid begins (1943)

The central Tunisian city of Sidi Bouzid is best known today as the birthplace of the Arab Spring. It was in Sidi Bouzid where Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire in December 2010 to protest what he believed was unfair treatment at the hands of Tunisia’s corrupt government. The repercussions of that single act of … Continue reading Today in North African history: the Battle of Sidi Bouzid begins (1943)

Today (or a few days) in North African history: the Battle of Kasserine Pass (1943)

The Battle of Kasserine Pass, which took place from February 19-25, 1943, was the follow up to the Battle of Sidi Bouzid earlier that month and and engagement at nearby Faïd Pass in late January. In the first two clashes, Axis forces under the command of General Hans-Jürgen von Arnim and Field Marshal Erwin Rommel … Continue reading Today (or a few days) in North African history: the Battle of Kasserine Pass (1943)

Today in American history: the burning of the USS Philadelphia (1804)

Stephen Decatur (d. 1820) is one of the US Navy's first famous figures, right up alongside Revolutionary War captain John Paul Jones, and among the first famous American military figures in general. Technically we should call him Stephen Decatur Junior, so as not to confuse him with his father, who was also an important early … Continue reading Today in American history: the burning of the USS Philadelphia (1804)