Today in European history: the Martyrs of Otranto (1480)

So an Ottoman Sultan who conquered Constantinople would naturally be inclined to anoint himself the new Roman Emperor. Mehmed seems to have taken his new title seriously enough that he had designs not just on ruling the Roman Empire as it was in 1453 (which, frankly, wasn’t all that impressive anymore), but on putting the… Continue reading Today in European history: the Martyrs of Otranto (1480)

Today in European history: the Martyrs of Otranto (1480)

Hi folks. A little housekeeping is in order. First, as you know I’m editing LobeLog for the next couple of weeks. That’s going to necessitate paring down the blogging here. That probably means a mix of shorter updates coupled with a few days off here and there. Tonight is going to be one of those… Continue reading Today in European history: the Martyrs of Otranto (1480)

Today in European history: the Martyrs of Otranto (1480)

Originally posted on and that's the way it was:
When Mehmed the Conqueror earned his nickname by conquering Constantinople in 1453, he also took another title: Caesar (Kaysar-i Rum, in Persian). Although today we think of 1453 as the end of the Roman Empire (and, to be fair, later Ottomans certainly thought of it…

Today in European history: the Martyrs of Otranto (1480)

When Mehmed the Conqueror earned his nickname by conquering Constantinople in 1453, he also took another title: Caesar (Kaysar-i Rum, in Persian). Although today we think of 1453 as the end of the Roman Empire (and, to be fair, later Ottomans certainly thought of it that way as well), at the time Mehmed seems to… Continue reading Today in European history: the Martyrs of Otranto (1480)