Today in US history: the burning of the USS Philadelphia (1804)

Stephen Decatur (d. 1820) is one of the US Navy’s first famous figures, alongside Revolutionary War captain John Paul Jones, and among the first famous American military figures in general. Technically we should call him Stephen Decatur Junior, so as not to confuse him with his father, who was also an important early American naval … Continue reading Today in US history: the burning of the USS Philadelphia (1804)

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Today in American history: the burning of the USS Philadelphia (1804)

It seems pretty odd to imagine a modern-day aircraft carrier or guided missile cruiser falling into the hands of an enemy during wartime, but that’s pretty much what happened in the case of the Philadelphia. She was one of the biggest ships in the (admittedly still small) American navy, but more importantly she was more … Continue reading Today in American history: the burning of the USS Philadelphia (1804)

Today in American history: the burning of the USS Philadelphia (1804)

Stephen Decatur (d. 1820) is one of the US Navy's first famous figures, right up alongside Revolutionary War captain John Paul Jones, and among the first famous American military figures in general. Technically we should call him Stephen Decatur Junior, so as not to confuse him with his father, who was also an important early … Continue reading Today in American history: the burning of the USS Philadelphia (1804)

Today in US history: the burning of the USS Philadelphia (1804)

Stephen Decatur (d. 1820) is one of the US Navy's first famous figures, alongside Revolutionary War captain John Paul Jones, and among the first famous American military figures in general. Technically we should call him Stephen Decatur Junior, so as not to confuse him with his father, who was also an important early American naval … Continue reading Today in US history: the burning of the USS Philadelphia (1804)

Today in Middle Eastern history: the Eisenhower Doctrine, or: They All Lived Happily Ever After (1957)

The United States enjoys two things more than just about anything else: doing war and making presidential doctrines about doing war. This country has been involved in some kind of military conflict or another for more than 90% of its existence, and of our 44 presidents, at least a quarter of them have issued some … Continue reading Today in Middle Eastern history: the Eisenhower Doctrine, or: They All Lived Happily Ever After (1957)